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NFL enhances game-day security with metal detectors

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10/31/2011

YARMOUTH, Maine—The National Football League plans to this month deploy hand-held metal detectors to all its stadiums in an effort to increase game-day security after a few high-profile incidents sullied its family-friendly image.

NFL's security chief responds to the 49ers' game-day shootings

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08/29/2011

YARMOUTH, Maine–The job of a security director in charge of events is not just preventing illegal access and foiling criminal activity, it's also about managing crowds and, when it comes to sports, potentially incendiary environments where passionate fans mix with alcohol.

NFL's security chief responds to the 49ers' game-day shootings

 - 
08/29/2011

YARMOUTH, Maine–The job of a security director in charge of events is not just preventing illegal access and foiling criminal activity, it's also about managing crowds and, when it comes to sports, potentially incendiary environments where passionate fans mix with alcohol.

Ravens improve security measures, but couldn't we just give fans helmets?

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Monday, July 26, 2010

Securing stadiums is certainly not a simple task and it's a topic we've covered fairly extensively here at SDN. One of my favorites was a tour of the new Dallas Cowboys Stadium, in case you missed it (there's even a cool video to go with it).

In addition, I also wrote a story recently about the University of Minnesota's effort to streamline and secure its new Golden Gophers’ TCF Bank Stadium. Many stadiums are turning to fans to enhance security as well. As a matter of fact, the NFL has been strongly encouraging its 32 teams to set up a system allowing fans to directly text the security department when issues arise in the stands.

Now, the Baltimore Ravens are having to step up security at its practice fields, according to this article in USA Today.

Apparently they've been having issues with large crowds vying to get autographs and have been forced to set up parameters. Now, players will only sign autographs for kids at football camp who are 6-15, are wearing a team-issued wristband, and are in a cordoned-off autograph zone.

"We have considered changing the way we do autograph signings for a few years," team president Dick Cass said when the announcement was made. "Our crowds for the morning practices have become so large that we've had safety situations with people pushing each other to try and get closer to the players. Often times, children would be put in difficult positions with the rush for autographs, especially from our most popular players."

That policy certainly makes sense from a security standpoint, but personally, if those kids are there for football camp, aren't they use to getting pushed around a bit? I think instead of setting up all these rules they just make getting an autograph some sort of tackling drill. I say, suit the kids up in their equipment, let them loose and make them work to get those autographs. I'm sure it'll make them tougher in the long run.

White noise

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Tuesday, November 6, 2007

I bet you have all heard by now: During the Patriots-Colts game on Sunday, there were some suspicious sounds heard in the RCA Dome. Some suspected the team was piping crowd noise in to distract their opponents.
And if you are concerned with this kind of potential fraud, who do you call?
Well, Patriots President Jonathon Kraft complained to NFL vice president of security Milt Ahlerich.
The NFL promptly investigated the incident and cleared the Colts from any wrongdoing, stating an "unusual audio moment" was the result of CBS tape feedback (You can make your on judgment here).
The reason I am posting this (I promise from here on out I will limit my football references for the remainder of the REGULAR season) is that this incident shows the how varied the scope of a security practitioner's job can be. And how mainstream it continues to become.