Y-12 nun, two other protesters await sentencing; construction issues, too

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12/06/2013

The now 83-year-old nun, 64-year-old gardener and 58-year-old housepainter who were found guilty of breaching security at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn., in July 2012 remain behind bars, awaiting sentencing.

The three peace demonstrators were found guilty last May on felony charges for cutting through a fence and defacing property at the maximum security uranium processing facility. Reportedly, they were undetected by the majority of the perimeter surveillance equipment, ground sensors, security guards and canine patrols.

A sabotage charge against each of them carries a maximum prison term of up to 20 years; the damaged property charge has a penalty of up to 10 years. Sentencing was initially scheduled for this fall but has since been rescheduled for Jan. 24.

Security experts have called the break-in the biggest security breach in the nation’s atomic history. The Department of Energy investigated and released a special report on the facility’s security failings, including inoperable security equipment, an inadequate security force, no timetables for the maintenance of security equipment, and lack of physical barriers. Previous studies said the problems had been present for 10 years, according to an article from Robert Lee Maril, sociology professor at East Carolina University.

And there’s more about some other seemingly major Y-12 problems, regarding the construction of a new new facility to be built at Y-12.

Maril writes:

In summary, the same two business entities, Bechtel Corporation and Babcock and Wilcox Company, tasked with security at Y-12, a security system breached by an octogenarian nun and two other senior citizens, are also the same two business enterprises in charge of the planning and design of the new facility, UPF, to be built at Y-12 (estimated total security costs at Y-12 at the time of the breach in 2012 were $150 million). To date, costs for the planning and design of UPF have risen in 2012 to $6.5 billion from approximately $1.1 billion in 2004. Several months after the security breach at Y-12, these same two corporations, Bechtel Corporation and Babcock and Wilcox Company, were named as the primary construction contractors for UPF at Y-12. At this time the NNSA refuses to provide taxpayers with the construction costs of the UPF until 2015.”

Food for thought?

You can read more about how the break-in and its impact played out on www.securitydirectornews.com.

 

 

Comments

todays world is full of danger .we cant trust anyone.we must take full precautionsfor protection.

 

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